Where Locals Can Convene In An Igloo Church

In Nunavut’s capital, several notable buildings are designed with traditional Inuit culture and aesthetics in mind. These days, in Nunavut, there aren’t many snow and ice igloos, or iglus, that are considered permanent residences. But there is one church in Iqaluit, Nunavut’s capital, that was clearly constructed with the traditional ice-block dome abode in mind.…

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100 Years Ago In Canadian Print Ads, Catalogues & Brochures

Back in the 1920s, doctors could write you alcohol prescriptions, mothers bought cars to keep the family together, freckles were called “ugly masks” and long-johns cured influenza. When I was a young kid, a game I played with my sister involved us cutting out items from a Sears catalogue and gluing them to paper to…

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This East Coast “Pink Church” Sells Vintage And Antique Treasures

But it is the stories of objects and people that make this boutique precious to the community. Nearly everything is in shades of white or pink and sparkles in a little room lined with windows at the base of The Pink Church‘s steeple. There are sequined handbags, lace gloves and vintage wedding gowns on display.…

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The Quebec Municipality With A Name To Exclaim

Saint-Louis-du-Ha! Ha!: a voyager’s gasp and a toponymist’s delight. While driving in eastern Quebec near the south shore of the Saint Lawrence River, you might come across road signs directing you to a community whose name will make you exclaim or laugh – or both. The small community of Saint-Louis-du-Ha! Ha!, population of 1,318, was…

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Snapshots Of The Wood Chip Dreadnought

If you follow the starfish, you will find the photo opp, wood shop and bed and breakfast. Since 2008, New Brunswick’s highways have been peppered with colour-coded signs with distinct symbols that lead the curious to curated scenic drives. The Acadian Coastal Drive is represented by red signs with starfish icons, meant to represent the…

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A Brief History (And Sampling) Of Ketchup Chips

They leave your fingers as red as our maple leaf flag. Cover art by: Megan Hunt, an Inuk artist and animator based in Iqaluit, Nunavut. Find more of her work on Instagram: @mutecutes Just like their sweet and sour flavour powder’s propensity for staining fingertips, the precise origin of ketchup chips is a little messy.…

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Bunkers Of Canada, Then And Now

A history of fallout shelters – top secrets, amateur bus bunkers, criminal bids and escape rooms. When the Soviet Union tested its first atomic bomb in 1949, the tension could be felt throughout Canada. Since our northern airspace was considered the most convenient route for the Soviet Union to attack the United States, many defensive…

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The First Photo Taken In Canada Was A Tourist Selfie

Popular tourist attraction, Niagara Falls, was the subject of the oldest surviving photograph taken of Canada. It could be the image of a postcard. The 1840 daguerreotype taken by British industrial chemist Hugh Lee Pattinson on a trip to Niagara Falls is the oldest known photograph of Canada. However, in 1840, Canada did not yet…

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Montreal’s FIFA Art Film Festival Will Be Screening Online This Year

After the annual art film festival was cancelled March 12 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, FIFA was encouraged by the community to offer its programming online. The 38th International Festival of Films On Art is coming to your home. From today until Sunday, March 29, at midnight, nearly all of the films that were going…

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The World Feels Better After Being With The Birds

Finding hawk parallax at Ontario’s Falconry Centre. Every week or so during the summer months, I drive my nine-year-old son Joseph to a woodlot an hour away, near a conservation trail in Newcastle, Ontario. There, Sam Trentadue, his falconry mentor and the force behind the Ontario Falconry Centre (OFC), shows him how to offer a…

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