Snapshots Of The Wood Chip Dreadnought

If you follow the starfish, you will find the photo opp, wood shop and bed and breakfast. Since 2008, New Brunswick’s highways have been peppered with colour-coded signs with distinct symbols that lead the curious to curated scenic drives. The Acadian Coastal Drive is represented by red signs with starfish icons, meant to represent the…

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A Brief History (And Sampling) Of Ketchup Chips

They leave your fingers as red as our maple leaf flag. Cover art by: Megan Hunt, an Inuk artist and animator based in Iqaluit, Nunavut. Find more of her work on Instagram: @mutecutes Just like their sweet and sour flavour powder’s propensity for staining fingertips, the precise origin of ketchup chips is a little messy.…

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Bunkers Of Canada, Then And Now

A history of fallout shelters – top secrets, amateur bus bunkers, criminal bids and escape rooms. When the Soviet Union tested its first atomic bomb in 1949, the tension could be felt throughout Canada. Since our northern airspace was considered the most convenient route for the Soviet Union to attack the United States, many defensive…

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The First Sunglasses Were Not Made For Beaches

Inuit, Yup’ik and other Arctic-living Indigenous peoples have been handcrafting sunglasses for at least 2,000 years. /// Cover art by: Megan Hunt, Nunavut artist currently based in Iqaluit. Follow her on Instagram: @mutecutes /// They go by many names. “Ilgaak” in the Nunavut Kivalliq dialect, “iggaak” in the North Baffin dialect, “nikaugek” to Central Yup’ik…

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One Halifax Cathedral Has A Ghost Window

Does a deacon haunt the oldest remaining Protestant cathedral in Canada? While there have been many tall tales and spun yarns surrounding the tragic 1917 explosion of a munitions ship in Halifax, even some of the more farfetched stories have physical evidence to help back them up. One cathedral’s eerie window silhouette is a good…

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The “Bear Of Very Little Brain” Gets An Ontario Museum Exhibit This Spring

Oh Bother! This immersive Winnie-the-Pooh exhibit will only run at Toronto’s Royal Ontario Museum March through August 2020. Let your inner child out to play while learning about everyone’s favourite pot-bellied, honey-loving fictional bear. Starting March 7, the Royal Ontario Museum is hosting the only Canadian stop of an international touring exhibition focused on A.A.…

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You Can Thank The Metric System For The Milk Bag

They look like plastic pillows or squishy rectangular balloons. Lined up in grocery store refrigerator rows, they can sometimes seem like a sci-fi space product to tourists (or even to Canadians from more westerly provinces). But to many folks in Ontario, Quebec and the Maritimes, the squishy white sacs are a symbol of comfort and…

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The Ontario Small Town That Feasted On A Circus Giant

PT Barnum’s traveling circus shows were a well-known attraction in North America in the 1800s. Once you joined, fame, fortune or at least notoriety was sure to follow. However, in the case of Jumbo, the most famous elephant of all time, he didn’t need Barnum to be a star. He was born a star. Jumbo…

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Celestial Ghosts Live In Northern Lights Legends

To any observer, the Aurora Borealis or “the northern lights” is a marvel to behold. When the iridescent pinks and greens light up and flicker frenetic dance moves across an Arctic sky, it paints the landscape into a handful of rarely-seen colours out on the land. Here, in a Nunavut winter, everything is white but…

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Shading In Maud Lewis

Peering through the windows of the late Nova Scotian artist’s painted house. In 2017, one of her paintings was found in a New Hamburg, Ontario thrift store bin. It was then appraised, exhibited and auctioned off for $45,000. Much like that painting, Maud Lewis – now one of Canada’s treasured outsider folk artists – lived…

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