Annual Ottawa Indigenous Festival Goes Virtual This Year

Indigenous chefs and artisans are teaching the public their crafts in video tutorials and other online spaces. Each year in Ottawa the Summer Solstice Indigenous Festival is held in June to celebrate the traditions of First Nations, Inuit and Métis cultures of Canada. Typically, over several days, pow-wows, craft work shops, cooking shows and concerts…

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Love After Death At The Thomas Foster Memorial

When others were feeling the squeeze of the Great Depression, Foster had the means and opportunity to see a dream come to life. On a concession road just outside Uxbridge, Ontario, the Thomas Foster Memorial has risen over farmers’ fields and relative obscurity for over eight decades to become a source of unexpected wonder for…

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Finding Kindred Spirits At Lucy Maud Montgomery’s Leaskdale Home

Her home was her sanctuary; a place she could abandon the amiable, passive masks she wore. When I was 11 years old, I read Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery, and much like millions of other young girls, I found a kindred spirit in the precocious redhead. It wasn’t until I was 37…

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Bunkers Of Canada, Then And Now

A history of fallout shelters – top secrets, amateur bus bunkers, criminal bids and escape rooms. When the Soviet Union tested its first atomic bomb in 1949, the tension could be felt throughout Canada. Since our northern airspace was considered the most convenient route for the Soviet Union to attack the United States, many defensive…

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The First Photo Taken In Canada Was A Tourist Selfie

Popular tourist attraction, Niagara Falls, was the subject of the oldest surviving photograph taken of Canada. It could be the image of a postcard. The 1840 daguerreotype taken by British industrial chemist Hugh Lee Pattinson on a trip to Niagara Falls is the oldest known photograph of Canada. However, in 1840, Canada did not yet…

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The World Feels Better After Being With The Birds

Finding hawk parallax at Ontario’s Falconry Centre. Every week or so during the summer months, I drive my nine-year-old son Joseph to a woodlot an hour away, near a conservation trail in Newcastle, Ontario. There, Sam Trentadue, his falconry mentor and the force behind the Ontario Falconry Centre (OFC), shows him how to offer a…

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Be Dazzled: Dig Your Own Gems At This Ontario Amethyst Mine

Amethyst Mine Panorama in Shuniah, Ontario is open from mid-May to mid-October. Amethyst Mine Panorama is a true northern gem with its five-acre area loaded with the semi-precious purple quartz. Visitors can come dig up their their own haul of amethysts while learning about the history of the mine and the gems it yields. This…

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9 Popular Literary Tourism Ideas For Book Lovers

Walk in the footsteps of your favourite writers or fictional characters on your next adventure. Who hasn’t closed a book or finished a story wishing the journey could continue? Or pondered what it would have been like to experience the settings of the characters you just spent time reading about? It’s not always clear where…

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The First Sunglasses Were Not Made For Beaches

Inuit, Yup’ik and other Arctic-living Indigenous peoples have been handcrafting sunglasses for at least 2,000 years. /// Cover art by: Megan Hunt, Nunavut artist currently based in Iqaluit. Follow her on Instagram: @mutecutes /// They go by many names. “Ilgaak” in the Nunavut Kivalliq dialect, “iggaak” in the North Baffin dialect, “nikaugek” to Central Yup’ik…

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Toronto Van Gogh Exhibit Pivots To Become A Drive-In Art Show

The multimedia art exhibit originally scheduled to open May 1 is adapting to meet the physical distancing and health guidelines with its Gogh by Car screening. A large-scale digital art exhibit featuring the work of Vincent Van Gogh announced it will open in Toronto next month. But don’t walk there – visitors will have to…

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