The First Photo Taken In Canada Was A Tourist Selfie

Popular tourist attraction, Niagara Falls, was the subject of the oldest surviving photograph taken of Canada. It could be the image of a postcard. The 1840 daguerreotype taken by British industrial chemist Hugh Lee Pattinson on a trip to Niagara Falls is the oldest known photograph of Canada. However, in 1840, Canada did not yet…

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The First Sunglasses Were Not Made For Beaches

Inuit, Yup’ik and other Arctic-living Indigenous peoples have been handcrafting sunglasses for at least 2,000 years. /// Cover art by: Megan Hunt, Nunavut artist currently based in Iqaluit. Follow her on Instagram: @mutecutes /// They go by many names. “Ilgaak” in the Nunavut Kivalliq dialect, “iggaak” in the North Baffin dialect, “nikaugek” to Central Yup’ik…

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One Halifax Cathedral Has A Ghost Window

Does a deacon haunt the oldest remaining Protestant cathedral in Canada? While there have been many tall tales and spun yarns surrounding the tragic 1917 explosion of a munitions ship in Halifax, even some of the more farfetched stories have physical evidence to help back them up. One cathedral’s eerie window silhouette is a good…

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The “Bear Of Very Little Brain” Gets An Ontario Museum Exhibit This Spring

Oh Bother! This immersive Winnie-the-Pooh exhibit will only run at Toronto’s Royal Ontario Museum March through August 2020. Let your inner child out to play while learning about everyone’s favourite pot-bellied, honey-loving fictional bear. Starting March 7, the Royal Ontario Museum is hosting the only Canadian stop of an international touring exhibition focused on A.A.…

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One Of The Clearest Lakes In The World Was Made By A Meteorite 1.4 Million Years Ago

Pingualuit Crater and its pristine lake in Northern Quebec’s Ungava Peninsula is nearly a perfect circle. During a 1950 expedition, a Globe and Mail news correspondent called it the eighth wonder of the world. But for the native Inuit in the Northern Quebec or Nunavik region, it was traditionally known as “the Crystal Eye of…

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Where Do Poutines Come From?

A brief compendium of potatoes, gravy and cheese curds. These days you can find poutine at some of the finest restaurants all over the world. Even though it has been a significant francophone and Quebecois cultural dish since the late 1950s, finding the simple fast food dish outside of Canada or even the province of…

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Walk Or Drive Across The Ocean Floor To Get To This Island

It is a street that disappears and reappears each day. Just don’t park or stop on the road for too long. In fact, Bar Road technically isn’t even a street – it is a gravel bar along the ocean floor. At low tide, Bar Road is the only pathway to access Ministers Island in the…

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You Can Thank The Metric System For The Milk Bag

They look like plastic pillows or squishy rectangular balloons. Lined up in grocery store refrigerator rows, they can sometimes seem like a sci-fi space product to tourists (or even to Canadians from more westerly provinces). But to many folks in Ontario, Quebec and the Maritimes, the squishy white sacs are a symbol of comfort and…

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Chicken Bones: The 135-Year-Old East Coast Candy (And Now You Can Drink It)

If you know – or have – a Maritimer grandma, you have probably seen chicken bones in her candy bowl. No, I don’t mean the actual skeletons of poultry. Ganong brand “Chicken Bones” are hot-pink hard candy sticks filled with bittersweet chocolate in little inch-long nubs. The cinnamon-flavoured confection sticks have been a New Brunswick…

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The Little Saplings That Could

Far, far above the tree line, two black spruces peek out from beneath a pile of snow on the steep and narrow Iqaluit, Nunavut street aptly called “One Way Road.” One tree is a bit taller than the other, while the other is a bit wider. They are tucked side-by-side against the wall of an…

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